Original publish date – Thu, 06 Oct 2011 09:07:47 +0000, Keith

Two items caught my eye.

One was about the transport sector code. See here.
The point made in the article is that the transport sector code is not seeing any benefits passed onto the people who were intended to benefit. The report quoted Mr Sam Monareng as saying that the sector code was gazetted in 2009. The report quoted him as saying “Stakeholders were then given a grace period of one year from August 2009, with the five-year time frame effectively commencing from August 2010”. This of course is not entirely true.

The transport charter applies from the date of gazetting, i.e 2009, and nowhere do the codes give any of the sector councils the right to give a grace period. A grace period must be gazetted as part of the codes. In any event the spokesman does clearly indicate that as from August 2010 the sector codes applied.

The report talks about the the usual problems of BEE – the slow pace of transformation.

The sector code came out in 2009, the transport dept does not even know that they do not have discretion to give a grace period, but did so anyway. Now there is a wonder as to why the slow pace of transformation. Even worse is many companies in the transport sector, even after August 2010 did not follow the transport sector codes. We have seen certificates dated way after August 2010, from companies in the transport industry that still use the generic codes. This is wrong and should invalidate their B-BBEE certificate. We naturally report all such instances to the dti, where we identify them. The dti reacts slowly or not at all. In some cases, they have asked the verification agency to withdraw the certificate, but they have no database to store withdrawn certificates, so their efforts are weak at best.

To repeat: Why do people wonder why the pace of B-BBEE implementation is so slow.

The second item was the initiative of the dti that is slow paced is the report that the dti has now launched a B-BBEE Management Development Program to be offered by Universities. We applaud the move to better quality BEE knowledge. However, as usual with the dti, the one arm does not seem to know what is happening with the other. We have tried for a week to get details of the courses, when they start, how long they are, and most importantly when the first batch of graduates will complete the course. This is important because SANAS and IRBA cannot accredit or approve any new agency or auditor until they have completed the prescribed higher education courses. It may well entail yet another delay in implementing the codes.